NUART 2017

RISE UP !

Nuart festival presents an annual paradigm of hybridity in global sanctioned and unsanctioned street art practice. Through a series of large and human scale public artworks, murals, performances, art tours, workshops, academic debates, education programs, film screenings and urban interventions, supported by a month long exhibition of installations, Nuart explores the convergence points between art, public space and the emergent technologies that are giving voice and agency to a new and more creative civilian identity, an identity that exists somewhere between citizen, artist and activist.

The real power of “street art” is being played out daily on walls, buildings, ad shelters and city squares the world over, and it’s now obvious that state institutions can neither contain nor adequately represent the fluidity of this transgressive new movement. As the rest of the world begins to accept the multiplicity of new public art genres, it is becoming more apparent, that street art resists both classification and containment. The question is, not how can this inherently public art movement be modified or replicated to fit within the confines of a civic institutional or gallery model, but how can the current model for contemporary art museums, galleries and formulaic public art programs, be re-examined to conform with the energy of this revolutionary new movement in visual art practice.

In the 1990’s, Situationist concepts developed by philosopher Guy Debord, surrounding the nature of “The City”, “Play” and the “Spectacle”, alongside sociologist Henri Lefebvre’s theories exploring the rights to shape our own public and mental space, came together to form an emergent adbusting “artivism”, which now forms the foundation of street art practice. Radical cultural geographer David Harvey has stated, “The right to the city is far more than the individual liberty to access urban resources, it is a right to change ourselves by changing the city”.

It is here, at the intersection between philosophy, geography, architecture, sociology, politics and urbanism, that Nuart situates itself, it exists as a critique of the colonization of everyday life by commodity and consumerism, whilst recognizing that one of the only radical responses left, is to jettison the hegemonic, discursive and gated institutional response to capitalism, and engage it directly where it breeds and infects the most, in our urban centers.

The challenge for a new and relevant public art isn’t to attempt to negate capitalisms neoliberal market logics with an ever more dominant liberal discourse, both are ultimately mired in a conflict that on the surface simply serves to feed the polarization and spectacle that we’re attempting to transcend. What we need is the active participation of citizens in the creation of their own holistically imagined environments, both physical and mental, a direct and collective response to space that leads to the shaping of place. A place in which the disengaged and passive citizens desired and ever more manipulated by market forces, are inspired to re-make themselves. Nuart proposes that the production of art in public spaces outside conventional arts venues offers the community, not only the most practical, but also the richest, most relevant and rewarding contexts in which this can happen.

It is in this “remaking” of self, this deep desire to engage with the world, to develop civic agency and purpose, that transcends identity, gender and class, and enables those locked out of the arts by a post-Adorno obscurant lexicon (eh?), that street art delivers. It offers an opportunity to reconnect, not only with art, but also with each other. Hundreds of people covering a vast swathe of demographics, from toddlers and single moms to refugees and property barons, on a street art tour conversing with each other, are testament to this.

We believe that when you want to challenge the powerful, you must change the story, it’s this DIY narrative embedded within street art practice, that forms the bonding agent for stronger social cohesion between citizens from a multiplicity of cultures, as our lead artist for 2017, Bahia Shehab will attest. It is this narrative, that is acting as the catalytic agent towards street art becoming a vehicle capable of generating changes in politics as well as urban consciousness.

The question of what kind of city we want cannot be divorced from what kind of person we want to be. The transformation of urban space creates changes in urban life, the transformation of one, being bound to the transformation of the other. What social ties, relationship to nature, lifestyles, technologies, art and aesthetic values we desire, are closely linked to the spaces we inhabit. The “banalization” of current city space, combined with the numbing effect of digital devices that guide us from A to B, have rendered us passive. Consumer cows sucking at the teat of capital trapped in a dichotomy between left and right, instead of right and wrong. And for the most, the hegemonic islands of sanitised cultural dissent we call Art Institutions, are either unable or uninterested, in engaging with the general public in any meaningful way.

In the early 2000’s, the evocative power of certain already existing and often crumbling industrial interzones, including that of Tou Scene, our main exhibition space, one that we were instrumental in establishing, gave rise to a new form of engagement with art in urban spaces that is only now being fully recognized and exploited. Street Art is at times of course co-opted and complicit with the “creative destruction” that the gentrification process engenders, but Capitalism’s continuous attempt to “instrumentalize” everything, including our relationship to art should be vigorously resisted. It is these “Stalker-esque” zones of poetic resistance, that initially gave shelter to one of the first truly democratic , non-hierarchical and anti-capitalist art forms, and unlike most cultural institutions, it is still, for the most, unafraid to voice this opinion, important in a time when even our art institutions are beginning to resemble houses of frenzied consumption. Street art exists to contest rather than bolster the prevailing status quo. As such, it is picking up as many enemies as friends within the field of public art.

By attempting to transform the city, street art attempts to transform life, and though by no means is all street art overtly political, it does, in it’s unsanctioned form at least, challenge norms and conventions regulating what is acceptable use of public space. In particular, it opposes commercial advertising’s dominion over urban surfaces, an area that Nuart are active in “taking over” throughout the year and in particular during the festival period. Our curating initiatives not only aim to encourage a re-evaluation of how we relate to our urban surroundings, but to also question our habitual modes of thinking and acting in those spaces. Street art is not just art using the streets as an artistic resource, but also an art that is questioning our habitual use of public space. Street art doesn’t simply take art out of the context of the museum, it does so whilst hacking spaces for art within our daily lives that encourage agency and direct participation from the public, “Everyone an artist” as Joseph Beuys would have it, and if it is accussed of being produced without academic rigour, we are reminded that he also asked, “Do we want a revolution without laughter?”.

Nuart’s programs are designed specifically to explore and silently challenge the mechanisms of power and politics in public space. Increasingly, we see the rights to the city falling into the hands of private and special interest groups, and yet, we have no real coherent opposition to the worst of it. The 20th Century was replete with radical Utopic manifestos calling for change, from Marinetti’s Futurist manifesto of 1909 to Murakami’s “Superflat” of 2000. Nuart’s annual academic symposium, Nuart Plus, acts as a platform for a resurgency in utopic thinking around both city development and public art practice, and whilst recognizing that street art is often co-opted and discredited by capital, it also recognises that even the most amateur work, is indispensable in stimulating debate and change in a Modern society that has developed bureaucracies resistant to seeing art, once more, as part of our everyday life.

As the Situationst graffiti scrawled on Parisian walls in 1968 stated, Beauty is in the streets, so Rise Up! and support those dedicated to unleashing one of the most powerful communicative practices known to mankind, there’s work for art to be done in the world amongst the living.

Martyn Reed, July 2017

INDOOR EXHIBITION

RISE UP! Shots of this years indoor installations in the vast tunnels at Tou Scene

OUTDOOR WORKS

A selected series of sanctioned and not so sanctioned works from this years event

NUART PLUS

Images from Nuart's annual academic symposium

OPENING NIGHT

The Mayor of Stavanger, Christine Sagen Helgø, opens Nuart's indoor exhibition at Tou Scene

CREW

A snapshot of the hard work and dedication that goes into making Nuart Festival possible !

SET UP

Work-in-progress shots from Nuart 2017

AMPPARITO (ES)

Born 1991 in Madrid, Ampparito is a young Spanish artist who’s conceptual murals subvert objects, meanings and realities to generate new experiences or situations...

BAHIA SHEHAB (EG)

Lead artist Bahia Shehab’s political street art was instrumental in the Egyptian uprising that saw widespread protests against poverty, unemployment, government c...

CARRIE REICHARDT (UK)

Carrie Reichardt is a self-titled ‘craftivist’. Her work blurs the boundaries between craft and activism, using the techniques of muralism, mosaic and screen-prin...

FLYINGLEAPS PRESENTS: DEREK MAWUDOKU (UK)

Born in London in 1959 and graduated from Goldsmiths College of Art in 1987 with a BA (Hons) in Fine Art, Derek Mawudoku has worked assiduously to produce an incr...

IAN STRANGE (AU)

Ian Strange (previously known as Kid Zoom) is a multidisciplinary artist whose work explores architecture, space and the home, alongside broader themes of disenfr...

IGOR PONOSOV (RU)

Born in Nizhnevartovsk in Siberian Russia in 1980, Igor Ponosov is an artist, activist and author of several projects and publications relating to urban art.

JOHN FEKNER (US)

John Fekner (b. 1950) is best-known for his series of environmentally conceptual works consisting of words, symbols, and dates spraypainted throughout the five bo...

KNOW HOPE (IL)

Over the past decade, Addam Yekutieli (aka Know Hope) has developed a visual iconography and language used to mirror real-life situations and observations, and do...

±MAISMENOS± (PT)

±maismenos± is an intervention art project by Portuguese visual artist and graphic designer Miguel Januário (b. 1981) that began in the scope of an academic thesi...

RICKY LEE GORDON (ZA)

Ricky Lee Gordon is best-known for his large-scale murals inspired by his experience in mediation and Buddhist Dharma (law of nature). His paintings explore the n...

SLAVA PTRK (RU)

Moscow-based artist Slava Ptrk focuses on social & political statements, interactive projects and site-specific artworks using stencils, posters, muralism, instal...

VERMIBUS (DE)

Berlin-based artist Vermibus regularly collects advertising posters from the streets, using them in his studio as the base material for his work. Here he transfor...

EXHIBITION & STREET ART TOURS - BUY TICKETS HERE

Ticket info for Nuart's 'Rise Up!' exhibition and street art tours

PRIVATE & COMPANY STREET ART TOURS

Private & company street art tours tailored to support your specific needs and interests.

NUART GALLERY

Nuart Gallery aims to nurture emerging regional and national talent whilst at the same time hosting and producing exhibitions and projects from some of the world’s leading street and contemporary artists.

THE UTOPIA BOX-SET

The Utopia Box-set. feat 14 of the worlds leading names in Street and Urban art. Available now !

WORK WITH US

Contact Nuart to discuss a creative partnership with the world's leading street art festival !

NUART PATRONS CIRCLE

Join Nuart's Patrons Circle and help to create something extraordinary !

VOLUNTEER WITH US!

Join our Nuart 2017 crew, sign up now and get to say "been there, done that, got the T-shirt!"

THE NUART APP

The Nuart iPhone App, powered by Geo Street Art, allows you to locate Nuart's street work on your iPhone, over 50 artists from the past 7 years have created one of Europe's most dynamic public art galleries. The Nuart App allows you to explore and share works from some of the worlds leading street artists.

ELOQUENT VANDALS BOOK

Eloquent Vandals The History of Nuart, is out now. Spanning over 5 years, 304 pages of exclusive images with essays from Tristan Manco and more...

ELOQUENT VANDALS DOCUMENTARY

Shot on location at Nuart Festival features work and candid interviews from some of the worlds leading players in the scene.
Running time : 25.17. Directed by Martin Hawkes

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